All Dutch trains now powered by wind energy

The Guardian reports that all trains running in the Netherlands are now powered by wind energy, as of 1st January 2017 (1 year ahead of schedule). 

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/10/dutch-trains-100-percent-wind-powered-ns?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_WordPress

Four Capital Cities Ban Diesel Cars From 2025

MIT Technology Review reports on the announcement that four global capital cities will be banning diesel cars from 2025 – Athens, Madrid, Mexico City and Paris – in order to improve air quality and drive adoption of electric vehicles.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/603026/four-huge-cities-are-banning-diesel-cars/amp/

Could A Giant Vacuum Cleaner Tackle Pollution?

FastCoExist highlights a device that sucks fine particulate matter from the air, that if deployed in sufficient numbers would clean the air in cities and other polluted areas.

The Dutch inventors claim the huge ‘vacuum cleaners’ can filter most of the fine particles emitted from vehicles / power plants and through industrial pollution – that have both health and climate impacts.
Source: https://www.fastcoexist.com/3065052/change-generation/this-giant-dutch-vacuum-cleaner-sucks-pollution-out-of-the-sky

Royal Caribbean to use LNG and fuel cells on ships to reduce emissions

Luxury cruises are increasingly popular but can come with huge environmental costs around ports and whilst at sea, due to sulfur and other harmful particulates from the heavy fuel oil burnt by most ships. Royal Caribbean is aiming to reduce such emissions from future cruise liners through a combination of liquefied natural gas and fuel cells from the early 2020’s.

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Image credit: Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.

Source: http://www.rclcorporate.com/rcl-steps-to-the-fore-with-plans-for-fuel-cell-technology/

Via: Engadget

World’s First Flatpack Truck Assembles in 12 Hours

Wired features a flat-pack truck designed for developing countries, initially in Africa, where access to rugged vehicles or indeed any reliable and affordable transport is limited at best.

The vehicles can be put together by three people in around 12 hours and take up considerably less storage space than preassembled cars/trucks. The vehicles could be useful in remote regions of developing countries via community ownership or donation by NGOs and philanthropists, as well helping recovery from natural disaster or humanitarian crises.

Source: https://www.wired.com/2016/09/can-assemble-worlds-first-flatpack-truck-12-hours-just-like-ikea-book-shelf/

Audi’s active suspension draws power from bumps in the road


Audi has developed an active suspension system – eROT – that captures kinetic energy from bumps in the road and potholes and converts it into electricity. From Engadget’s article:

To convert kinetic to electrical energy, the shocks use a lever arm that captures up-and-down wheel motion and transmits it to a 48 volt alternator. It’s then converted into electricity, with an average recuperation output of 100 to 150 watts — as little as 3 watts on a freeway, and up to 613 watts on a rough county road.

Via Engadget: https://www.engadget.com/2016/08/11/audi-regenerative-active-suspension/

Sweden tests ‘electric highway’ for freight trucks

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From Engadget:

Siemens and Scania have teamed up to trial what’s being called the world’s first “electric highway.” Much like an electrified railroad, the 1.2 mile stretch has a series of wires hanging overhead that a pantograph-equipped truck can connect to. Then, the vehicle can deactivate its fuel-burning engine and coast along on that delicious, dirt-cheap electricity, switching back when the wires stop.

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2016/06/24/sweden-electric-highway/

Hybrid solar & biofuel plane to cross Atlantic

Solar-plane

Inhabitat features a hybrid solar and biofuel plane that will attempt a trans-Atlantic crossing later this year, which if successful will be the first zero-carbon flight over the Atlantic.

The article states that the plane will be “powered by a combination of solar energy and biofuels produced from microalgae, which was developed specifically for the Eraole. Wing-mounted solar panels will provide 25 percent of the plane’s power, while 55 percent will come from the algae-derived biofuels. For the remaining 20 percent of the time, the plane will simply glide on wind currents.”

Source: http://inhabitat.com/hybrid-solar-and-biofuel-plane-to-attempt-first-zero-carbon-trans-atlantic-flight/