A Solar Lamp For Refugees

Fast Company reports on a solar powered lamp developed to help refugees and those in developing nations reliant on kerosene lamps. From the article:

The SolarPuff is a two-ounce, flat-pack solar lamp which quickly expands into a 4.5-inch cube. The lantern can last eight hours and easily recharges with clear sunlight. It provides enough light for refugees or people in impoverished areas to perform tasks at night, without instigating any dangerous fires or needing batteries.

Source: https://www.fastcompany.com/40439433/how-a-small-solar-light-is-saving-refugees-lives

Concept: Low-cost arsenic detector for drinking water

SHENDY is an open-source and low-cost arsenic detector being developed by an international group of students. The aim is to create a smartphone connected device that can test whether groundwater is safe to drink based on its arsenic content, which is often at poisonous levels in post-conflict zones and after natural disasters.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1499966707/low-cost-open-source-arsenic-detector-for-drinking

Concept: Aid-Delivering Drone That Breaks Into Edible / Useful Parts

FastCoExist highlights the development of a humanitarian drone for disaster and conflict zones by Windhorse Aerospace that is packed full of food and useful parts. From the article:

“Because the drone, called the Pouncer, is designed for one-way delivery, it can be broken down and reused when it arrives. Chop up the lightweight plywood frame, and it becomes kindling for a fire to cook the food. The wings themselves are packed with meals. The protective covers around the food can be used in shelters.”


Source: https://www.fastcoexist.com/3064094/this-humanitarian-aid-delivering-drone-is-going-to-be-edible

Concept: A sturdy disaster shelter that collapses for easy transportation

Inhabitat features a concept design for an emergency or post-disaster shelter that can be collapsed for easy transportation. From the article:

“..each Shelter Pack provides sleeping accommodations for four people, as well as a bathroom, kitchen, and built-in dining table.”

“Overall, each installed Shelter Pack home provides 129 square feet of living space that can sustain residents for months on end.”

Source: http://inhabitat.com/shelter-pack-emergency-homes-compress-to-31-inch-tall-slabs-for-easy-transport/

A durable post-disaster dwelling

Inhabitat features a disaster and emergency shelter designed to feel more like a home.

Hex House

Unfortunately most recovery and development work after a disaster or displacement takes years rather than days or weeks, so the idea behind the Hex House is to give people a comfortable, semi-permanent space that could last many years and includes solar panels and a rainwater capture system.

Source: http://inhabitat.com/hex-house-is-a-rapidly-deployable-affordable-home-for-disaster-victims/