Solar paint converts water vapor into hydrogen fuel

Via Inhabitat:

Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne have created a revolutionary new solar paint that can be used to produce endless amounts of clean energy. The innovative paint draws moisture from the air and splits it into oxygen and hydrogen. As a result, hydrogen can be captured as a clean fuel source.

Source: http://inhabitat.com/revolutionary-solar-paint-creates-endless-energy-from-water-vapor/

Concept: A sturdy disaster shelter that collapses for easy transportation

Inhabitat features a concept design for an emergency or post-disaster shelter that can be collapsed for easy transportation. From the article:

“..each Shelter Pack provides sleeping accommodations for four people, as well as a bathroom, kitchen, and built-in dining table.”

“Overall, each installed Shelter Pack home provides 129 square feet of living space that can sustain residents for months on end.”

Source: http://inhabitat.com/shelter-pack-emergency-homes-compress-to-31-inch-tall-slabs-for-easy-transport/

ByFusion turns ocean plastic into building blocks


Inhabitat features a brilliant way of using waste plastics polluting the worlds oceans, called RePlast. Developed by the US-based ByFusion, the approach compresses mixed plastics from the seas and turns it into construction blocks. As well as cleaning the oceans, the approach doesn’t require splitting the plastics into different types and generates c. 95% less greenhouse gases than concrete blocks.

Source: http://inhabitat.com/byfusion-turns-all-types-of-ocean-plastic-into-eco-friendly-construction-blocks/

Self sufficient neighbourhood under construction near Amsterdam

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FastCoExist reports on the construction of a self-sufficient ReGen Village in the suburbs of Amsterdam that will generate it’s own power, grow food and manage its waste.

Source: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3060167/this-new-neighborhood-will-grow-its-own-food-power-itself-and-handle-its-own-waste

Solar cell creates power from sun and rain

Engadget reports on the development of new solar cell technology that could allow solar panels to generate power from both sunlight and rain, by incorporating a thin layer of graphene. The approach has some way to go before becoming viable but it could encourage wider instalation of solar panels in climates with more variable weather.

http://www.engadget.com/2016/04/11/solar-cell-generates-power-from-raindrops/

New process uses CO2 as cement replacement

Phys.org reports on a process proposed by a multi-disciplinary team at UCLA to capture and utilise CO2 from power plant smokestacks and then use the gas to create a new building material like cement – CO2NCRETE.

Source: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-carbon-dioxide-sustainable-concrete.html (via Engadget)

Eco-friendly bricks made from sand and bacteria

BioMason

Inhabitat features eco-friendly bricks made by BioMason from a mixture of sand and bacteria, that could have a huge, positive impact on the environment. Not only are they produced more quickly and with less energy and CO2 emissions than regular bricks, they can also soak up pollution from the atmosphere.

Inhabitat states: “Traditional bricks, which are also made from sand and binding agents, have to be “fired” for three to five days, a process which generates approximately 800 million tons of carbon emissions each year. BioMason’s biobricks take only two or three days to ‘grow’ and eliminate the emissions altogether. What’s more, Dosier says her company’s bricks can even absorb pollution, making them an active agent in the war against climate change.”

Source: http://inhabitat.com/biomasons-bricks-grown-with-sand-and-bacteria-to-hit-the-market-next-year/

Researchers turn paper waste into biodegradable aerogel for insulation

Inhabitat reports on research in Singapore that shows a way to recycle paper waste into an important and high demand material used for building insulation, called aerogels. Per Inhabitat:

“Aerogels are typically made from silica, metal oxides, and polymers, but a paper-based formula is a great deal more eco-friendly and cost-effective. Recycling paper into a highly sought after substance like aerogels could prove to be a useful method for reducing landfill waste, while replacing hazardous chemicals often used in aerogel manufacturing.”

Source: http://inhabitat.com/scientists-turn-mountains-of-paper-waste-into-biodegradable-aerogel/

Rollable concrete: faster, cheaper and stronger – via Springwise

cortex-roll

Springwise highlights an innovation in that mainstay of modern construction – concrete. Cortex Composites has developed water-activated rolls of concrete that are quicker to install, stronger, cheaper and less resource intensive than standard concrete production.

Sources: http://www.springwise.com/cement-alternative-cheaper-stronger-quicker-install/ and http://cortexcomposites.com/